• The Last Unkillable Thing by Emily Pittinos

    This is a review of the poetry collection, The Last Unkillable Thing by Emily Pittinos. I gave this 2.75/5 stars. Themes and General Thoughts “How much of enjoying a place is destroying it?” These poems all follow different directions but seem to culminate upon the central theme of mourning. I felt that some poems were clearly stronger than the others, and there was only one that I felt completely drawn into. There seemed to be a lack of flow in many of them, and the style of some (specifically the ones with colons separating every few words) didn’t work with their story. Every so often, the poems seem to fit…

  • The Grief We’re Given by William Bortz

    This is a review of the phenomenal poetry collection, The Grief We’re Given by William Bortz, which I gave 5/5 stars. Overview “all which I haven’t known is all I ever feel” As the title suggests, this collection all revolves around a theme of grief. The poems all touch on different aspects of the same emotion but truly emphasize how the feeling is all-encompassing, but yet possible to live and thrive with. General Thoughts and Writing “what is hope if it isn’t worth losing everything for” Filled with raw emotion and tender longings, these poems were spectacularly crafted to break your heart, but also help you put it back together.…

  • Top 10 Books of 2020

    Hello! Continuing with my 2020 wrap-ups, (the first was my reading stats which you can find here) I wanted to share my favorite books of the year. I read so many incredible ones so narrowing it down to 10 was difficult. This list is not in any particular order, because I had a difficult time comparing many of these books to decide which I felt was better, so instead, they are just random. The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde This was my favorite classic of the year. Wilde’s writing was so descriptive and rich with emotions, I absolutely loved it. The characters were incredible as well. The relationship…

  • You Should See Me in a Crown by Leah Johnson

    This is a spoiler free review of You Should See Me in A Crown by Leah Johnson, a standalone contemporary, which I gave 4/5 stars. Plot This story follows Liz Lighty, a high school senior whose future is all set, until her financial aid for college falls through. Then, she’s reminded that the winners of Prom King and Queen get scholarships, so now she’s setting off to win the competition, one that’s hotly contested in her high school. But along the way, she begins to catch feelings for Mack, a new student who’s also running for prom queen. Will their budding relationship stand the test of the competition? Or will…

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